NEWSFLASH: COP26 postponed due to COVID-19

While thinking and writing more broadly about the pandemic and its implications for climate change, I pause to share this news just announced by the COP26 presidency. The UK says that COP26 will be delayed until sometime in 2021, still taking place in Glasgow, Scotland and with the pre-COP still being held in Milan, Italy.Continue reading “NEWSFLASH: COP26 postponed due to COVID-19”

The power in, and of, NDCs

The Paris Agreement is built on Nationally Determined Contributions or NDCs. In them, country parties pledge what they will do within their borders to help keep global temperature rise “well below” 2C. Most developed country NDCs are based on economy-wide mitigation targets, like the EU’s 40% reduction in GHG emissions by 2030 from a 1990Continue reading “The power in, and of, NDCs”

Tort law in US climate litigation

Webinars can provide a high impact/low carbon footprint way of learning. The current pandemic makes them all the more useful. I will regularly feature a few that I attend, highlighting organizers who pack the most learning per hour for me. This week the Center for Progressive Reform spotlighted US state tort law’s role in holdingContinue reading “Tort law in US climate litigation”

Survey says? Add your voice on how to shape a “2020s Green Breakthrough”

Dual Citizen, a consulting firm based in the US, invites you to take this short survey polling specific ways governments, investors, businesses, and individuals can reduce GHG emissions quickly in the next decade. I found the questions thought provoking because the provided answers were quirky at times, at various levels of altitude – and sinceContinue reading “Survey says? Add your voice on how to shape a “2020s Green Breakthrough””

Putting Climate Change (and COP26) in Context

Our friends at IISD – those indefatigable PhDs who sleep little and write lots at MEA meetings around the world – have produced a report that captures their take on where global environment governance is at the start of 2020. Just as the ENBs produced by these deeply informed chroniclers diplomatically yet accurately recount theContinue reading “Putting Climate Change (and COP26) in Context”

Climate litigation updates: Oh Canada!

Closer to my Green Mountain home, three appellate courts in Canada have now ruled on the constitutionality of the country’s Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Pollution Pricing Act. The Courts of Appeal for Ontario and Saskatchewan have held it constitutional while the Court of Appeal for Alberta has held the opposite. The Canadian Supreme Court will hearContinue reading “Climate litigation updates: Oh Canada!”

Climate litigation updates

It has been a busy last month for climate change in the courts. Decisions recently issued by French, UK, and Canadian judges have affirmed domestic mitigation obligations that underscore the Paris Agreement’s role in setting shared climate change norms. I published this law review article four years ago, which described a range of climate changeContinue reading “Climate litigation updates”

UK’s full-court press on climate diplomacy

Un grand merci to the French think tank, IDDRI, which recently blogged about the UK presidency’s plans for the November 2020 COP26. It was announced on February 13 that Alok Sharma will serve as the COP26 President. His new job title is Secretary of State for the Economy, Energy and Industrial Strategy. Two weeks later,Continue reading “UK’s full-court press on climate diplomacy”

Why you have to understand COP24 to unpack COP25

Copenhagen. Paris.  COP15.  COP21. These are the most recent international climate change  meetings that everyone knows.  COP15 in Copenhagen marked a low point in multilateral environmental cooperation, with the “back room” deal by the top global emitters not accepted by the 197 Parties who must agree on its actions by consensus at its closing plenary. Continue reading “Why you have to understand COP24 to unpack COP25”

Where we left off in Katowice

Much was written about the outcomes right after COP24. All point to the progress in providing detail for all of the Articles listed on the PAWP, except Article 6 on cooperative (markets) mechanisms.  C2ES acknowledged the Rulebook achievement as “pivotal” while noting concern that the politics surrounding the COP’s tepid acceptance of the IPCC 1.5C reportContinue reading “Where we left off in Katowice”

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